Entertainment & Arts

English National Opera director Mark Wigglesworth resigns

Mark Wigglesworth has resigned as musical director of the English National Opera. In an email, he said he was leaving because the ENO was “evolving now into something I do not recognise”. The company, which has faced a period of turmoil, said he would depart at “the end of the current season”. “He will continue… Continue reading English National Opera director Mark Wigglesworth resigns

Magazine

Germanwings crash: Have cockpit doors changed?

It’s one year since Germanwings Flight 9525 crashed, killing everyone on board. There was widespread concern that the captain found himself locked out of the cockpit by the co-pilot, but has anything changed? A year ago, a Germanwings flight from Barcelona to Dusseldorf was travelling over the French Alps. The plane’s final contact with air… Continue reading Germanwings crash: Have cockpit doors changed?

Magazine

Project Greenglow and the battle with gravity

A handful of leftfield scientists have been trying to harness the power of gravity. Welcome to the world of Project Greenglow, writes Nic Young. In science there exists a uniquely potent partnership between theory and engineering. It’s what’s given us atomic energy, the Large Hadron Collider and space-flight, to name a few of the more… Continue reading Project Greenglow and the battle with gravity

Science & Environment

Earliest evidence of humans in Ireland

A bear bone found in a cave may push back dates for the earliest human settlement of Ireland by 2,500 years. The bone shows clear signs of cut marks with stone tools, and has been radiocarbon dated to 12,500 years ago. This places humans in Ireland in the Palaeolithic era; previously, the earliest evidence of… Continue reading Earliest evidence of humans in Ireland

Science & Environment

Ancient scrolls give up their secrets

The discovery pushes back the date for the first use of metallic ink by several centuries. The Herculaneum scrolls were buried by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in AD79 and are charred and fragile. Previous efforts to read them, over many centuries, has damaged or destroyed some of the scrolls. The task of reading the… Continue reading Ancient scrolls give up their secrets

Science & Environment

Rate of carbon emissions put in context

We are now putting carbon into the atmosphere at a rate unprecedented since at least the age of the dinosaurs, scientists say. The researchers have examined ocean sediments laid down during the so-called Palaeocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum – a dramatic warming event some 56 million years ago. They find the amount of CO2 going into the… Continue reading Rate of carbon emissions put in context

Science & Environment

Dawn spies new detail in Ceres’ bright spots

The US space agency’s Dawn satellite continues to return remarkable images from the dwarf planet Ceres. Now just 385km above the surface (lower than the space station is above Earth), the probe has revealed new features inside the mini-world’s Occator Crater. This is the 92km-wide depression that has multiple bright spots of what arethought to… Continue reading Dawn spies new detail in Ceres’ bright spots

Science & Environment

Ash tree set for extinction in Europe

The ash tree is likely to be wiped out in Europe, according to a review of the evidence. The trees are being killed off by the fungal disease ash-dieback along with an invasive beetle called the emerald ash borer. According to the research, published in the Journal of Ecology, the British countryside will never look… Continue reading Ash tree set for extinction in Europe

Technology

Syrian Electronic Army hacker suspects charged

The US has named and charged three men it believes were involved in cyber-attacks carried out by a group calling itself the Syrian Electronic Army. The organisation hijacked prominent social media accounts and defaced and blocked access to websites. Two of the men are also accused of extortion. One of the suspects – Peter Romar… Continue reading Syrian Electronic Army hacker suspects charged